35th Pordenone Silent Film Festival diary – Day #3 – Glorious Vamps, mysterious stars, communists and more

Of course, the point in Algol is that this energy could be miraculous if that leading greedy millionaire would stop overpricing it and give it to the people for free.

The ending of the film is unusual. All of a sudden, just as the whole thing comes up to a climax, a primal dance begins, symbolizing moral decadence. This dance distracts the baddies so much that the film is allowed to conclude abruptly. Perhaps, however, the film is missing a few final sequences. I haven’t looked into it. Still a great film that needs to be mentioned more, particularly in the context of German expressionism.

algol2

“Algol,” by Hank Wreckmeister (Germany, 1920)

I’m about to fall asleep so I will keep the other films short. I watched a Danish short film titled Firefly (1913), directed and starring actor director Einar Zangeberg, who was also known as a daredevil. The film is about two kids kidnapped by gypsies but the story is not very interesting.

What is great is the fantastic sequence in which the leading lady, who has gone from being an upper class child to a young and attractive circus performer, does her titular trick for which she is best known. This shot alone with its colour and sheer magic is worth seeing the film for.

Then again, as a quick note, I continued viewing the Who’s Guilty? serial. This morning, it was two instead of one episodes – one of them, Sowing the Wind, is missing a full first reel, though you can still understand what the tragedy in this one is all about. The second, Beyond Recall, is definitely the least interesting the ones I have seen in the serial so far, especially because of its lengthy and dull courtroom sequence.

As Collins’ film On the Stroke of Twelve from yesterday showed me, courtroom drama and silent films somehow don’t go too well together…

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One thought on “35th Pordenone Silent Film Festival diary – Day #3 – Glorious Vamps, mysterious stars, communists and more

  1. Pingback: 35th Pordenone Silent Film Festival | CINECOLA

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