Review – BANANAS (Woody Allen, 1971, United States)

Woody Allen’s Bananas draws on the 1970s political climate, with references to student radical movements, Latin American revolutions and the political instability of the banana republics. It also follows in the tradition of the anarchic films of W.C. Fields and, most notably, those of the Marx Brothers (such as Duck Soup). Furthermore, one may link…

Review – MANHATTAN (Woody Allen, 1979, USA)

Manhattan is the film of a cineaste at the peak of his powers. Woody Allen’s 1979 feature is regularly referred to as his best work, alongside Annie Hall (1977). Allen, a self-proclaimed workaholic, has often referred to his obsession with death as a driving creative force. He constantly represses his fear of death by keeping…

Review – ELLE (Paul Verhoeven, 2016, France / Germany / Belgium)

Paul Verhoeven’s Elle begins mid-rape; the rape of its protagonist Michèle (Isabelle Huppert) by a man wearing a ski-mask, as a cat looks on, apparently unmoved. Once finished, the man flees and Michèle, with a puffy face and blood coming out of her vagina, picks herself up, cleans herself off, orders take out and carries…

MOONLIGHT (Barry Jenkins, 2016, USA)

Moonlight, directed by Barry Jenkins, is a masterpiece of our time. It’s an exciting testimony to the enduring power of cinema, and its constant evolution, which nowadays is more often than not defined by technological advancements rather that authorial prowess, perspective, and representation. Moonlight is the story of young Chiron and is split into three…